2019 ASU Geosciences Career Night

Join the Phoenix Chapters of the Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists (AEG) and Geo-Institute (G-I) at the 13th annual student night on April 16th, 2019 from 6-9pm. This is an opportunity for students to learn how diverse the geologic field is and what types of positions are available as a professional. We will pair students and professionals for mock-interviews for the students and lightening talks by professionals. This is also a night for professionals to meet students and learn what they are studying and what they hope to do once they graduate. Don’t miss out on this terrific networking opportunity!                                

The event will be held at the Ventana Room of the ASU Tempe Student Memorial Union (301 E. Orange Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281). For directions, please refer to the map of the ASU Campus and Student Memorial Union, or visit http://www.asu.edu/map/interactive/.

Cost is 40 dollars for non-members, 30 dollars for AEG or G-I members, and free for all students. A buffet dinner will be provided. For companies wishing to sponsor a table at the event, the cost is $100 per table and will include admission for two representatives. Companies represented with a table will also have sponsorship recognition in a slideshow. There is a limited number of tables and speaker slots available. Please contact Daniel Rosenbalm with G-I at 480-659–4101 with questions, or email aeg.arizona@gmail.com.

RSVP (including table and speaker reservations) at: http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=k98vleyab&oeidk=a07eg5sf9dz2a55067b

Hosted By: AEG, G-I




March Dinner Meeting – 2019

March Dinner Meeting – 2019




Mapping Grand Canyon Conference

Join us February 28 through March 1, 2019 at the Mapping Grand Canyon conference at ASU!

https://lib.asu.edu/mapping-grand-canyon-conference




AEG Holiday Social – 2018

RSVP – Click here

Join us December 3, 2018 for our Holiday Social.




September Dinner Meeting 2018 – Joint Meeting with GI

 

Geotechnical Special Presentation

Arizona Chapters for the Geo-Institute and Association of Engineering and Environmental Geologists Presents:

BRIDGE SCOUR AND ITS COUNTERMEASURES: MONITORING, STREAMLINING AND BIOCEMENTATION

Speaker: Julian Tao, Ph.D,
Associate Professor at Arizona State University

Date: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 — 5:30 p.m – 8:00 p.m.

Location: McFate Brewing Company 1312 North Scottsdale Road Scottsdale, Arizona 85257

Dinner/Presentation:
$30.00 Members and Non-Members; $15.00 Government Employees and retirees; $10.00 Students Please RSVP by Monday, September 17, 2018

RSVP – CLICK HERE




2018 ASU Geoscience Career Networking Event

2018 GEOSCIENCE CAREER NETWORKING EVENT




February Dinner Meeting – 2018

February 2018 Dinner Meeting




January 18, 2018 Dinner Meeting

There may be some flaws from a deleted post that has the incorrect date. The correct date for the next dinner meeting is on Thursday, January 18, 2018.




January Dinner Meeting – 2018

January Dinner Meeting – 2018




August 2017 Dinner Meeting

August 16, 2017 at McFate Brewing Company

Speaker: Kelin Whipple, ASU, SESE

Topic: Interpreting Active Tectonics from Topography

Sponsored by: Tensar International Corporation

RSVP HERE!

Landform analysis has become a standard tool in neotectonic studies.  The timescales recorded in deformed landforms importantly bridge the gap between geodetic and geologic methods.  Most commonly the offset, tilting, and warping of abandoned depositional landforms is used to infer deformation rates and patterns.  Whereas such analyses of static landforms has become well developed, complementary approaches to extract quantitative information about tectonics from erosional landscapes are relatively new, rapidly evolving, and can provide powerful insight.  Over the last couple decades, some useful general rules about the expression of rock uplift rate in erosional landscapes have been developed that can guide and augment studies of the spatial and temporal distribution of active rock uplift.  At catchment scale, the relationship between landscape form and rock uplift is dictated largely by the response of stream profiles to rock uplift, which is largely one of changing channel steepness (gradient adjusted for drainage area).  Changes in channel steepness along a stream can be either abrupt (discrete slope-break knickpoints) or gradual (expressed as zones of enhanced or reduced river profile concavity) depending on the deformation pattern.  Landforms can record information about both spatial and temporal patterns in rock uplift rate.  Landscapes in various parts of the Himalaya exemplify both spatial and temporal influences.  I first highlight lessons learned about the relationships among topography, climate, and erosion rates from studies using cosmogenic isotopic concentrations in river sands over the last decade that importantly guide tectonic interpretation of landscapes. Then I illustrate application of these methods to three sectors of the Himalaya-Tibetan orogenic system: (1) the NW Himalaya in Pakistan (location of the 2005 Kashmir (Muzaffarabad earthquake), (2) the Longmenshan on the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (location of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake), and (3) the central Himalaya in Nepal (location of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake). I show that both the 2005 Kashmir EQ and the 2008 Sichuan EQ occurred on steep out-of-sequence thrusts in events predicable from the topography. The central Nepal location is interesting in that the topography indicates a similar architecture of active faults, but the long-expected 2015 Gorkha EQ ruptured the gently dipping basal decollement and not the inferred steep out-of-sequence fault. I explore the implications of the 2015 Gorkha EQ, and controversy around interpretations of structural architecture, in some depth.